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Journal Publication Process

The publication process might seem a bit complicated to researchers, particularly the early career researchers. Most research novices feel pressured to secure a journal publication fairly early in their career. Along with the desire to amass expert recognition in academia, authors also want their research to effectively add to the existing body of literature. Thus, researchers often seek to answer the pivotal question of how to publish a paper. When considering how to publish a journal article, authors need to be strategic, authentic, and fairly innovative. This section covers all aspects researchers need to consider at the pre-publication stage: planning the research paper, selecting the best journal for your manuscript, dealing with peer review, ensuring compliance to guidelines and ethics, and using editorial services to enhance the chances of acceptance of your manuscript.
Deciding the order of authors on a paper
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In my earlier post on authorship, I had discussed ICME guidelines that help researchers in deciding whether a contributor qualifies to be an author or not.
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I am going to submit my first paper for which I am the main contributor. During the course of this study, a senior post-doc in our lab helped me troubleshoot and suggested some key experiments. He even helped me analyze some data. I would like to include his name as a co-author on this paper. Also, my research advisor wants me to include the name of one of our collaborators who provided some cell lines that we used in this study, but I’m not sure about this. I would like to know whether there...
  • Anonymous
  • Oct 16, 2013
  • 35,668 views
Writing an effective cover letter for  journal submission
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Most journals require that a cover letter be submitted along with each manuscript submitted for publication. Unfortunately, few authors are aware of the actual impact that a cover letter can have
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I am about to submit my first manuscript for publication. Since journal editors receive hundreds of manuscripts, I would like to know what aspects they check first? I would like to ensure that my submission makes a good impression.
  • Anonymous
  • Oct 16, 2013
  • 40,991 views
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I submitted my manuscript to a journal and received an outright rejection because the plagiarism software showed about 60% similarity. This is because my manuscript is very technical and I cannot use different words. Do journals rely completely on plagiarism detection software?
  • Anonymous
  • Oct 16, 2013
  • 29,355 views
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In statistics, “power” refers to the ability of your study to identify effects of substantial interest. Basically, at the time of designing your study, you need to consider four essential factors. Read on to find out what these are. 
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The International Committee of Medical Journal Editors (ICMJE) defines a clinical trial as any research project wherein human subjects are prospectively assigned to an intervention group or a control group to study the cause-and-effect relationship between a medical intervention and a health outcome.
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Recent times have witnessed a drastic increase in the number of cases of scientific misconduct. In fact, the number of documented cases—419 in 2012, which is twice the number in 2011)—is too large to be ignored.
Top 10 mistakes authors make---As compiled by a committee of journal editors
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What are the most common mistakes authors make? I will share the views of a committee of journal editors, who are also the compilers of the popular medical style guide, the AMA (Association of Medical Editors) Manual of Style.  
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External funding is often essential for successful research. The importance of grant-writing skills is increasing, because the pressure to publish is putting a strain on resources and funding is now becoming more difficult to obtain.

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