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Journal Publication Process

The publication process might seem a bit complicated to researchers, particularly the early career researchers. Most research novices feel pressured to secure a journal publication fairly early in their career. Along with the desire to amass expert recognition in academia, authors also want their research to effectively add to the existing body of literature. Thus, researchers often seek to answer the pivotal question of how to publish a paper. When considering how to publish a journal article, authors need to be strategic, authentic, and fairly innovative. This section covers all aspects researchers need to consider at the pre-publication stage: planning the research paper, selecting the best journal for your manuscript, dealing with peer review, ensuring compliance to guidelines and ethics, and using editorial services to enhance the chances of acceptance of your manuscript.
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Every researcher conducts a literature search to ensure that the topic he or she has chosen to work on has not been published earlier. But what happens if, after submitting your manuscript, you discover that such a study does exist, and you have missed it during your literaure review? This case study finds out what can be done if you suddenly realize that your research is rendered completely redundant by the existence of a published study that you had never come across.
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I will cite the source, but just present the original text with a few minor changes. Would that be considered as plagiarism although I have mentioned a reference number (2) that proves it’s been cited. Here's the original text: In our study, the volume (as a percent of the initial volume) of the remaining cysts that were followed up in the first 4 months after sclerotherapy using acetic acid was one-half that of the ethanol group (Fig. 1). The number of cysts that regressed to under 10% of the...
  • Y.J Jo
  • Apr 14, 2015
  • 34,967 views
The scarce peer reviewer and challenges journal editors face
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Journal editors face various challenges while appointing reviewers. This post discusses these challenges and how editors deal with them. 
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Hi, I have been following your articles since my graduation. Currently, I am studying architectural engineering and browsing research manuscripts, mostly about postmodern architecture. I would like to write and publish an article in the future, but at present I find it hard to even summarize the articles I'm reading as they are mainly in English. Can you please give some tips to make it easier for me to review existing literature in my field? I don’t know how and when I’ll be able to start...
  • Anonymous
  • Apr 8, 2015
  • 23,316 views
how a journal editor identifies potential peer reviewers for a submitted paper and the reasons for delay at this stage of editorial decision making
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In this post, Dr. Goldman discusses how a journal editor identifies potential peer reviewers for a submitted paper and the reasons for delay at this stage of editorial decision making. 
Why is peer review so slow? The first step – identifying peer reviewers
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Authors find the peer review process daunting mainly because of the delays in editorial decision making. Why do editors take long to inform authors about the fate of their paper? The Chief Editor of Polar Research, Dr. Helle Goldman, provides an editorial viewpoint in this article that explains the journal-end of the peer review process. This post is the first segment of the series titled "Delays in peer review."  
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Conflicting reviewer comments can be confusing, especially when there is no clear guidance from the editor about which comments to address. This article reports a case where the author received diametrically opposed comments from two reviewers, and how the Editage team helped her tackle them.
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I have a question about writing affiliations for a medical manuscript. I am currently working for University Hospital A and attending University Graduate School B at the same time. So I would like to list both the affiliations in my paper. After browsing through a few SCI papers, I feel they allow this. Although I have received a confirmation from the graduate school that it’s okay to list both, I am still not sure about it. I look forward to your opinion on this.
  • Anonymous
  • Mar 24, 2015
  • 16,255 views
Are journal instructions for authors easy to understand?
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Are journal instructions always well-written, clear, and easy to understand? When we asked authors and journal editors what they thought about journal instructions, their responses indicated a clear gap between their opinions. This indicates the need for increased intervention and communication between authors and editors to ensure a smoother publication process. Source: International journal editors and East Asian authors: two surveys
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I submitted my paper to a journal more than a month ago. The editor emailed me saying he cannot get in touch with the reviewers I recommended, so he asked me to suggest other reviewers. After I re-recommended reviewers, the status changed from "Under review" to "Evaluation recommendation." Does it mean the review is done and the editor is evaluating my paper? Is there any other possibility?
  • Anonymous
  • Mar 15, 2015
  • 46,156 views

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