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Publication Buzzwords

From the earliest days of the printing press to speedily disseminating scientific knowledge online through open access journals, academic publishing has come a long way. What are the most important topics of discussion in scholarly publishing today? Stay tuned to this section to know more about the buzzwords in the scholarly publishing industry: journal impact factor, scientific paper retraction, research impact metrics, and more.
Is impact factor everything?
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Although the impact factor is the oldest and, arguably, the most widely used citation metric, it has lost some of its former glory. In recent years, the impact factor has come under considerable criticism for its limitations, and the academic research community is
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Traditional metrics for measuring scholarly impact, such as the impact factor of the journal, h-index, etc., are familiar to all researchers. But although still very popular, citation-based bibliometrics have been under criticism for various reasons, such as they cannot appropriately map 
Open access journal selection
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With new open access journals entering the publication space every day, all with highly varied article-processing charges, how do you determine whether you’re really selecting the best possible journal for the price you’re paying? Here's a new free online interactive tool to help you out!
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I’d like to raise a debate about a topic that I’ve found very intriguing lately. The National Institutes of Health (NIH), USA, the largest source of funding for biomedical research in the world, is currently
What are the most common reasons for retraction?
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The number of published papers being retracted is increasing dramatically and is higher than ever before. Although retracted papers still represent a miniscule proportion of the total published literature, the rate of increase in retractions is alarming, as retracted papers tarnish
Looking forward: A new formula designed to measure your future h index
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A group of three researchers affiliated to different institutions in Chicago, IL, recently published a paper in Nature, in which they have proposed a new formula that researchers can use to predict what their h index will be five years later.
Does the Nobel Prize need some changes?
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It is that time of the year when the Nobel Prize winners are announced and researchers wait anxiously to see if their specific field of study is recognized. I congratulate all the winners, who are well deserving of this award for the impact they have had in their respective fields. But now
Why every researcher must register for a unique contributor id right now!
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Have you often wondered how your research activities and achievements can be distinguished from those of other researchers with similar names? If your name appears as “Zhang W” on your research publications, how can you prevent another “Zhang W” from taking credit for your citations or patents?
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I am sad because I recently got an email from the editor of a journal in which my paper is published, requesting me to retract the paper because they found some errors in my data and statistical analysis. I am worried about my reputation if I have a retracted paper. I may not get a grant for my next study. Please advise me.
  • Anonymous
  • Oct 16, 2013
  • 101,518 views
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I have completed my PhD in Physical Chemistry from the Institute of Physical Chemistry, Peking University. I have applied for a fellowship in a prestigious American university. The competition for the position is likely to be intense. As a female candidate, are my chances of getting the position the same as those of equally qualified male applicants?
  • Anonymous
  • Oct 16, 2013
  • 26,542 views

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