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Publication Buzzwords

From the earliest days of the printing press to speedily disseminating scientific knowledge online through open access journals, academic publishing has come a long way. What are the most important topics of discussion in scholarly publishing today? Stay tuned to this section to know more about the buzzwords in the scholarly publishing industry: journal impact factor, scientific paper retraction, research impact metrics, and more.
Safeguarding yourself against predatory journals: A case study
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Often, bogus or predatory journals send email invitations to authors to submit their articles, luring them with promises of quick publication. What happens when an author falls prey to such a bogus journal? How can authors assess the credibility of a journal?
Protect research from predatory publishers
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Have you received an e-mail inviting you to submit your paper to a journal that sounds familiar and the list of editorial board members are well-credentialed professionals? Their invitations are tempting, promising speedy peer review and publication. If you’re a new author who is eager to publish, you might respond. And you might be dismayed to find that, upon submission, a hefty article processing fee is charged and your article receives little or no dissemination. This article takes a look at...
National Science Foundation's report
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Globally, science and technology is making great strides. Remarkably, developing nations are fast catching up with the developed nations in terms of R&D investment, technological advances, research output, and research outreach. To map these changes and latest trends world over, the NSF has put together a report Science & Engineering Indicators 2016 that was released in January 2016. 
misrepresenting science
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Time and again, the media has been accused of distorting the image of science. But is bad journalism the only reason behind the mistrust in and misrepresentation of science? A recently published study made an interesting revelation that journals are as responsible as, or maybe even more than media, for biased reporting of science. So who’s responsible for misrepresenting science – media or journals?
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While the advocates of open science stress on transparency and accessibility, there is a growing sentiment among some scientific folk about the need for nondisclosure of certain details in publishing, to counter the the “status over merit” culture of academia. This article explores the role anonymity plays in scientific publication and whether removing all indentifiers from a published work would help science. 
Retraction notices
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While the phenomenon of retraction has received a lot of attention from the scientific community, what has not received enough eyeballs are retraction notices. Most journals do not provide the reasons behind retraction, and thus, the negative connotation about retraction continues to prevail. Apart from this, ambiguous reraction notices are damaging to scientific progress. Questions about what an ideal retraction notice should look like, what journals and authors can do to bring more...
Snippets from the most interesting goings-on in research and academic publishing in December 2015
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December has been an eventful month for science. This post lists some of the most interesting news items handpicked by our team of editors. From the historic climate summit in Paris to interesting developments on the scholarly publishing scene, we bring you some snippets from the goings on in academia this month.
ORCID Survey 2015
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ORCID (Open Research and Contributor Identifier), a non-profit, community-based initiative aimed at creating unique identifiers for researchers, conducted a survey to understand researchers’ awareness and perceptions of ORCID. 
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Researchers scramble to boost their publication record by targeting to publish in high impact factor journals as their career advancement depends on it. Consequentially, most researchers face a dilemma while choosing a research question: choosing a novel idea is risky as it may or may not yield positive results whereas a conventional idea anchored in established areas is more likely to lead to desired but not exciting results. What do most researchers end up choosing? Does their choice affect...
Let’s talk science
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Science has seldom been a topic of drawing room conversations. The general public tends to believe that science is a complex subject that is best left to its stakeholders – the researchers. Moreover, they perceive researchers as an elite and reclusive crowd that sits in ivory towers. This communication gap between researchers and the public has given rise to several problems that have impacted science and public welfare. Is it time for researchers to break the bubble and reach out to the public...

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