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Publication Ethics

What is duplicate submission? Can a paper be published without ethical approval? Is it ethical to use data from a previous paper? This section provides guidance on publication ethics: authors can learn about the code of ethics in research to avoid accidental plagiarism and the importance of obtaining ethical approval. Developing good ethical research practices can help authors publish their work ethically, and avoid rejection and retraction due to misconduct.
Assigning authorship where it's not due: Case study
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We have heard of co-authors being denied authorship, but what if researchers who have not been a part of a paper are listed as co-authors without their knowledge? Wondering why anybody would want to do that? Read this case study to find out.
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I have two papers: both have the same basic data, and the results have some similarity. However, the depth of data analysis are totally different: one paper goes 50% deeper at least than the other one. Is it still duplicate publication?  
  • Anonymous
  • Dec 1, 2016
  • 3,592 views
How a predatory journal tricks an author into paying APCs at the time of submission
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Synopsis: Often, predatory journals send email invitations to authors to submit their articles and lure them into paying APCs with assurances of publication. However, they do not always live up to their promises of publication. This case study follows one such case and makes authors aware of the tricks that predatory journals use.  
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Does signed authorization by the patient or representative require use of the form specific to the journal or can the patient sign a "generic" IC that has the required elements and use that for journal submission with the manuscript? Although the case report for publication is de-identitified, the editor and publisher now have the patient's name and signature. Why did the ICMJE not utilize a Physician Attestation of Informed Consent (PAIC)?
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What is the value of the last position of an author? I have already read the guidelines of International Committee of Medical Journal Editors (ICMJE) and some of the questions posed to “Ask Dr. Eddy” about authorship such as: Basics of authorship in academic publishing, Deciding the order of authors on a paper, Who qualifies to be an author? But I did not find guidelines about the last author. What is the correct position of the main senior supervisor, especially when he is not the head of the...
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I submitted a paper to Cancer Medicine in open access 3 years ago. If I submit this OA paper (to the university) as a thesis now, won’t that be considered as duplicate submission?
  • Anonymous
  • Oct 19, 2016
  • 4,673 views
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I have submitted my paper to a journal, but after that, one of the co-authors made an objection regarding the contents. I had received only a verbal agreement from him/her before submission. The manuscript is currently under editorial check and has not yet been sent for peer review. The co-author seems to think that this paper does not comply with authorship guidelines, and he/she has another target journal in mind. Under the current circumstances, I think it is best to withdraw the paper. How...
  • Anonymous
  • Oct 19, 2016
  • 10,709 views
Ethical principles of publishing traditional medicine research
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The ethics of research in traditional medicine have recently been hotly debated. This post helps authors understand the ethical principles governing publication in traditional medicine journals by outlining six broad aspects to be considered.
OMICS acquires Canadian publishers
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OMICS International, the India-based academic publisher, which is facing serious charges of unethical publishing practices and publishing junk science, has acquired two reputable Canadian publishing companies. This development has sent shock waves throughout the global academic community.
Should research misconduct be considered a criminal offence?
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Typically, after researchers are accused of misconduct, the institutions they are affiliated with conduct further investigations. Instances where misconduct leads to prosecution are rare. However, some science professionals state that research misconduct should be criminalized. Would considering academic fraud a criminal offence be fair to researchers? Would such a step encourage researchers to be ethical and honest? Is it possible to deal with research misconduct in a courtroom?

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