Free personalized coaching

You are here

Submission and Peer Review

Everything you need to know about journal submission and peer review processes is covered in the section. This includes answers to the questions most researchers have about the status of their paper and in-depth information regarding tracking the paper's progress from submission to publication. Tips and guidance about responding to peer review comments, resubmitting a paper, or corresponding with the journal editor for inquiry or withdrawal of also form an important part of this section.
viewed
I submitted a paper to a journal, and the status changed from "under review" to "evaluating review." What is the implication?
viewed
My paper was rejected by the journal Critical Care. Actually I have had another experience of rejection by the same journal. However, at that time, the decision letter said “Final Decision Reject,” while this time, it is a simple rejection. Does that mean there is a little possibility that my paper would be given a second chance if I resubmit?
  • Anonymous
  • Dec 8, 2015
  • 16,606 views
Quiz: Do you know what it takes to be a good peer reviewer?
viewed
Take this quiz to find out how much you know about conducting peer review of a scientific manuscript. If you get all questions right, you get the right to brag about it to your colleagues. Answers to all questions are in the series: Tips for first time peer reviewers.
Why peer reviewers refuse review requests
viewed
As the volume of publishing is increasing, journal editors are finding it increasingly difficult to appoint reviewers as many refuse review requests. What are the reasons behind this refusal apart from the primary premise that it is a voluntary act?  
This article explains how to conduct peer review of a scientific manuscript and write a review report
viewed
Peer reviewing a scientific manuscript can be a difficult task for first time reviewers. This article lists the main responsibilities of a peer reviewer, explains how a reviewer can evaluate a scientific manuscript, and provides suggestions on how the review report should be drafted.
viewed
Is there any connection between paper quality and review speed? I submitted two of my papers to two different journals. For both the journals, there were some other colleagues submitting papers their papers around the same time. However, their papers got accepted in a few months, but mine are taking longer. I don't even know the initial decisions as yet. People submitting their paper to journal A got acceptance in one month, and my paper is still under review for 1 months and 10 days....
  • Anonymous
  • Nov 13, 2015
  • 13,900 views
Publishing a manuscript with Wolters Kluwer
viewed
Even though you wrote and edited your manuscript, did you know that once you submit it to a journal for publication and the journal accepts your paper, the journal owns the copyright? One exception to this rule is when you publish a manuscript via Open Access. So what does this mean for you if you want to reuse your work?
viewed
Recently, I have submitted my manuscript to a peer reviewed journal (Wiley). It has been almost two weeks since the status is showing under consideration. Does it mean my manuscript has a chance to be sent for peer review? Can you just throw some light on the process? I am very new to research and this happens to be my first paper. Just very anxious!!
  • Mr. CB
  • Oct 29, 2015
  • 64,724 views
viewed
When selecting a journal, do I have to cite all those in that journal who have already published in my area? Or, can I submit what I feel is the best representation of my thought without worrying about what this journal has to say about? What questions do editors of the journal ask before considering a paper for acceptance? What are the criteria to be met to get published in their journal?
Poor copyediting leads to errors in published article, and errors are corrected, but the correction notice does not indicate the journal's fault
viewed
Poor copyediting leads to the publication of a paper with errors and without final approval by the author. When the author informs the EIC, a correction is made, but the correction notice does not clarify that the errors had been made by the journal. The upset author wants the notice to be removed. but is that the right course of action? Read on to find out.

Pages