Download free handbook

You are here

Baby food exposes young children to illegal levels of inorganic arsenic

Editage Insights | May 9, 2017 | 855 views
Rice-based baby food found to have illegal levels of arsenic

Rice and rice-based products are commonly given to babies who have been weaned of breast milk as well as young children under the age of five, since rice is nutritious and these products are easily available. However, rice has inorganic arsenic that is ten times higher than other foods, and long-term exposure to arsenic can pose several health risks to children’s IQ development and growth. European Union has, therefore, in January 2016 imposed a maximum limit of inorganic arsenic on manufacturers producing rice-based baby food. Despite the ban, researchers at the Institute for Global Food Security at Queen's found that 50 per cent of baby food still contains high level of inorganic arsenic. According to Professor Meharg, lead author of the study and Professor of Plant and Soil Sciences at Queen's, “Simple measures can be taken to dramatically reduce the arsenic in these products so there is no excuse for manufacturers to be selling baby food products with such harmful levels of this carcinogenic substance.” He believes that manufactures should be held accountable for not meeting EU’s standards and that the product label should mention the amount of arsenic present in it.

Read more in Science Daily.       

Republish

Like this article? Republish it!
Knowledge should be open to all. We encourage our viewers to republish articles, online or in print. Our Creative Commons license allows you to do so for free. We only ask you to follow a few simple guidelines:
  • Attribution: Remember to attribute our authors. They spend a lot of time and effort in creating this content for you.
  • Editage Insights: Include an attribution to Editage Insights as the original source.
  • Consider a teaser: Yes, that’s what we call it…a teaser. You could include a few lines of this post and say “Read the whole article on Editage Insights”. Don’t forget to add the link to the article.
  • Re-using images: Re-publishing some of the images from our articles may need prior permission from or credit to the original image source.
  • Quick and easy embed code: The simplest way to share this article on your webpage would be to embed the code below.

 

Please copy the above code and embed it onto your website to republish.
Join a community of 179000+ researchers
Editage Insights offers a wealth of free resources on academic research and publishing. Sign up and get complete access to a vibrant global community of researchers. Gain expertise & share your own with authors and others involved in scholarly publishing.
By clicking 'Join Now', you agree to our Terms & Privacy Policy.
Having trouble registering/logging in? Contact us
Q & A

Have your own question?