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Handpicked favorites: A glimpse at our team's favorite discussion articles

Editage Insights | Nov 24, 2017 | 1,448 views
Handpicked favorites: A glimpse at our team's favorite discussion articles

As part of the celebrations of the fourth anniversary of Editage Insights, we have already shared with you our team's favorite infographics and videos

This week, we asked our team to pick their favorite discussion-based articles. And guess what? We ended up with an interesting assortment, which we want to share with you! Usually, discussion-based articles present varied perspectives on the topics that create buzz in the scholarly community. But they also touch upon other interesting themes such as global trends in academic publishing, career-related topics, politics and science, and so on.    

In the unlikely case that you still aren’t completely familiar with our brilliant team members, here they are!

Editage Insights Team

Let’s now dive into the favorite picks:

1. China's reversing brain drain: Why Chinese researchers are choosing to return to China

What this article’s about: Today, China has become a land of opportunities not just for the homegrown researchers but also for those Chinese researchers who had left the nation in search of greener pastures in the West. This article explores why China is keen on reversing the brain drain, what is attracting Chinese researchers back to China, and how life is for the expatriate researchers.

This is my pick because the world is always curious about China and people may have certain perceptions and prejudices without truly understanding the culture. This article puts things into perspective. – Clarinda

I chose this as my favorite because it’s a really interesting article that covers topics that many people in scholarly publishing are interested in – China, research in China, and Chinese research in the global publishing landscape. – Jayashree

2. Greece's debt crisis: How it's affecting the country's R&D, healthcare, and brain drain rate

What this article’s about: The 2015 economic crisis in Greece led to many speculations about the future of the country's science and research landscape. This post takes a look at the effect of the economic downfall on Greece's R&D, healthcare, and brain drain rate.

The political and economic circumstances in a country have a phenomenal impact on its scientific landscape. This article analyzes how Greece’s economic woes had a deep impact on the country’s science and research, and highlights the strong relationship between science, economics, and politics. – Sneha

3. What are the most worrying problems facing modern research?

What this article’s about: A general assumption is that fraud and plagiarism are some of the most concerning problems facing modern research, but when a group of researchers surveyed 1353 attendees of international research integrity conferences about the problems that they thought were the most worrying, the results were different.

This is my pick as it is an insightful article that underlines some of the crucial problems in modern research and how these may be damaging for science. – Kakoli

4. Challenges postdocs face and how mentors can help build their career

What’s this article about: Apart from the stress of publishing papers and doing lab work, another intimidating challenge postdocs face is building their independent career as a researcher. So the role of a supportive mentor or principal investigator is vital in propelling a postdoc into a successful academic career. This article attempts to answer questions such as – What are some of the most common causes of rift between mentors and postdocs? What should a postdoc do to avoid these problems?

I like this article because it addresses a very common concern in publishing—fallouts between postdocs and lab heads. It also touches upon the most common causes of rift and what one should to do to avoid these problems. – Aparna

5. Should data secrecy be considered research misconduct?

What’s this article about: Although most researchers agree that data sharing is the scientific ideal, there exists a general skepticism regarding making their data publicly accessible. Since withholding data can impede the progress of science in more ways than one, should it be considered as a form of scientific misconduct?

This is a very interesting topic. While the scientific community is going open on all fronts such as going open access and sharing data, is it acceptable for some to choose not to join this trend? This article explores this aspect and provides a thought-provoking perspective on something I had never thought about before. – Sheng-Fen

6. Why peer reviewers refuse review requests

What’s this article about: As the volume of submissions is increasing, journal editors are finding it increasingly difficult to appoint reviewers as many refuse review invitations. What are the reasons behind this refusal apart from the primary premise that it is a voluntary act? 

I like this article because it provides an insight into the perspective of reviewers in the face of the growing volume of manuscript submissions to journals. It was also interesting to know that gender may play a role in reviewers’ refusal of review invitations. – Andrea

There you have it! Do you have a favorite discussion-based article? Does it match any of our team favorites? We love hearing from you! Go through our articles and post your personal favorite in the comments section below!

Related reading:

Handpicked favorites: A collection of our team's favorite infographics

Handpicked favorites: A glimpse at our team's favorite videos

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