This content belongs to the Manuscript Rejection Stage

Most researchers face journal rejection at some stage of their career. Is there a way to avoid rejection? Suscribe to understand why journals reject manuscripts and what you can do if your manuscript gets rejected.

Q&A: Does an unusually quick peer review indicate rejection?

I submitted my manuscript via "Scholar one manuscripts". It was under review for only one week and now the status is "Awaiting final decision" for 2 days. Does fast review predict rejection?

1 Answer

On an average, peer review takes anywhere between 1-3 months. It is rather unusual for the review process to be completed within a week. However, journals using ScholarOne Manuscripts often have a shorter peer review time. As mentioned in the IEEE website: “Electronic submission through IEEE ScholarOne Manuscripts speeds up the review process and shortens the time between manuscript submission and publication.”

You should check the website of the journal to find out the average review time. It is possible that the journal has a shorter review time: some journals provide a shorter deadline to reviewers to speed up the review process. Another possibility is that the journal has a rapid publication option, in which case it is quite normal for the review to be completed in a week’s time.

It is difficult to predict whether a short review time indicates rejection. I don't think there is any clear correlation between the time taken for review and its outcome. If a reviewer is quick, or is not tied up with other commitments at the time, it is possible to complete a review within a week's time. Additionally, ScholarOne also provides some facilities, such as click-through citation linking, which makes the peer-review smoother and less time consuming for reviewers. 


This content belongs to the Manuscript Rejection Stage

Most researchers face journal rejection at some stage of their career. Is there a way to avoid rejection? Suscribe to understand why journals reject manuscripts and what you can do if your manuscript gets rejected.