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Publication Planning

Find tips and resources that help authors plan their publication journey from research publication planning to creating a publication schedule. This begins with finding the right research question and progresses to understanding the different types of articles, selecting a journal, ensuring compliance to guidelines, and creating a publication schedule. The excellent textual and multimedia content in this section makes publication planning a breeze for authors.
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I have submitted one article to the journal with impact factor (SJIF) 0f 3.7. Later I came to know that the SJIF impact factor will not be considered the actual impact factor. My paper is already accepted, and now I want to withdraw my article. Please give me suggestions.
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Good day! I am a resident pathologist from the Philippines, and I was asked by my boss to make a study on a new approach to signing out cases. However, I am stumped as to how I should present this case. All he wants is for me to present this approach, so my main objective, according to him, was to present the approach. Which kind of study should I use for this? Thank you!
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I am preparing my first manuscript for international publication. It is a systematic review. I used Elsevier journal finding tool, and it recommended 10 journals that were a good match according to the title and abstract. I found a journal with impact factor 2.6 accepting only reviews and they mentioned that the acceptance rate is 100%. I could not understand what does it mean that 100% of papers submitted accepted?
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I wonder how, in my area of biomechanics, balance and electromyography, could I list down the best journals and the ones with the best impact factor? Is it only by checking the articles that I read in my research? Is there another way to search for the key ones?
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Clinical trials constitute a critical stage of clinical research and it is important to understand what clinical trials are and what forms they take. In this slide deck, we will tell you more about the types and phases of clinical trials. The idea is to help you form a basic understanding of clinical trials. This is a two-part series and the next segment will focus on the things you must remember when preparing to publish a clinical trial manuscript. Coming soon - Part 2: Things to remember...
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Are post-hoc studies analysis of pooled data from previously carried out clinical trials? Or are they clinical trials conducted on specific efficacy or safety parameter from previous trials?
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I would like to present my study as a poster at a conference, prior to submitting the paper to my target journal. The thing is I would like to add two more colleagues’ names (I have already 2 co-authors) in the conference presentation. The two colleagues' names will be NOT presented in my manuscript when submitting it to the journal though. It would be great if you could give me some advice on this.
  • Anonymous
  • Feb 11, 2016
  • 11,428 views
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What kind of perspective articles are published in Nature Geoscience? I can't find this article type on the site but have seen perspective articles published in the journal. I want to write an article and submit to Nature Geoscience. I want to understand the difference between perspective, letters, and research article.
  • Anonymous
  • Feb 8, 2016
  • 15,131 views
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Hi, I have a question on self-plagiarism. Can I take some parts (Data, Methods) from my published paper, and use them for the manuscript that I am currently writing? Would that be considered as self-plagiarism? I think it shouldn't be an issue if I cite the parts properly. Can you give me some tips on this?
  • Anonymous
  • Jan 28, 2016
  • 11,631 views
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What is the best way to refer to myself in the manuscript: 'I' or 'the author'? Can I say 'The author thinks that..." Is this correct?
  • Anonymous
  • Dec 14, 2015
  • 11,726 views

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